hair loss help.com is your complete hair loss guide and resource for info about Propecia, Rogaine, minoxidil, transplants, thymuskin, Revivogen, folliguard, tricomin and other hair loss and baldness remedies
Hair Loss Help
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Demodex mite & hairloss
Topic Summary:
Created On: 11/05/2005 02:04 AM
Status: Post and Reply
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
1 2 3 4 Next Last unread
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 11/05/2005 02:04 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

Originally Chrome had made a post on this topic but has since deleted it. As such I'm making my own here


In the original thread (Click here) Peter Mac said:

Quote

Originally posted by: Peter Mac
oh brother, not the demodex bug again....

http://www.hairlossscams.com/SpotScams.htm

8) Bugs! Bugs are eating your hair! The bug in question is a mite called Demodex Follicularum. Science has known about them since the 1840's. They're found in all adult humans in ALL hair follicles all over your body and yet hairs flourish all over your body, even in places you'd rather not have them.



Originally I came across the demodex bug while researching some possible causes of hairloss in dogs. I came across this site (www.thepetcenter.com) which showed a demodex mite infection in both a dog as well as a human. Here is what it said about human infestation:

Quote

HUMAN DEMODEX
Human demodex cases are rather rare but do occur. It is believed that demodex mites are a common residents of hair follicles in dogs and humans, and when present in few numbers in a healthy individual seldom cause clinically observable cases. Under certain unknown conditions, though, humans can develop clinical cases of demodex mites. The images below are of an animal caretaker who became infested in the facial regions with demodex mites. She had been providing the dog with prescribed treatments in the animal hospital. After consulting with a human dermatologist she was eventually able to eliminate the mites but the process entailed numerous topical treatments and also systemic medications. After six months of treatment, all symptoms of the mites disappeared.


Here is one picture from the women involved in the case:




Now this site wasnt selling a damn thing for humans (was geared towards demodex and pets) but did mention demodex mite infections could occur in people. Furthermore, I came across this site (http://members.ozemail.com) in which it stated (in contect of rosacea):

Quote

Rosacea & Inflammation: Demodex Skin Mites
"Acne Rosacea" is a disease which involves the hair follicles, and does not have anything to do with the skin's oil production per se.
Imbalanced skin (which can be worsened by inappropriate treatment), often characteristic of rosacea, can compound the problem. The cause of rosacea is not known, although many factors have been established as potential triggers.

Dormant hair follicles are present over most of the face and may produce light hair growth due to hormonal variations, or the effects of some medications. In any event they are penetrable openings in the skin's structure and often home to Demodex Mites.

Demodex Parasites frequently lie in pairs inside a hair follicle
Demodex are covered by a cuticle surface and are semi-transparent
The head and neck contain the four legs
Demodex mite embedded in keratinized skin cells
Source: Microscopy Magazine, The Netherlands

Demodex live around these follicles and have four short legs, choosing to move mostly at night. The level of infestation increases with age. This infestation is a world-wide phenomenon called "demodicosis" and is usually symptom-free. Reactions and accompanying inflammation can occur in humans. It also occurs in animals, including family pets, leading to skin irritation, hair loss and red rash.

Fresh skin scrapings viewed under a microscope can reveal the mites which feed on dead cells and skin fats.

The prevalence of this mite in people with rosacea has been recorded as significantly higher than people without rosacea:

an infestation of 51% in rosacea;
an infestation of 28% in eczema;
an infestation of 31% in lupus discoides.
The highest density of mites present on the cheeks in people with rosacea and antibiotic usage at the end of one month showed no statistically significant difference in mite density.

It is possible that the increased number of demodex mites in rosacea cases plays a part in rosacea by provoking inflammatory or allergic reactions by blocking follicles or by assisting the survival of micro-organisms.

Studies at Gaziantep University Department of Dermatology (Turkey) concluded that while rosacea is a skin disease with a variety of origins, demodex mites can increase the severity of inflammation.

A high density of demodex mites has been especially linked to rosacea associated with pustules.
the role of demodex mites in impairing micro-circulation and dilated capillaries has been tentatively suggested
Flushing and the mechanism of blood vessels has been seen as important in the development of rosacea.


Anyhow, I'm not implying that demodex mites cause androgenetic alopecia (AA is caused my hormones as the name itself suggests!)! I am wondering if demodex mites might play some role in inflammation however... While inflammation isnt the root of androgenetic alopecia it may act as a catalyst.

My main interest in the subject remains in context of my little female sheltie mix who developed some persistent alopecia on her chest... However, besides the knew jerk reaction from some members on HLT (and maybe Peter Mac here) I havent really heard any good evidence discounting that demodex might play some role in hairloss (again, not the cause but perhaps a contributing factor).

To say that demodex mites play no role in hairloss simply because many other humans who dont have hairloss also have them is like saying DHT cant play any role in hairloss since people who dont lose their hair also produce DHT!!!!
 11/05/2005 09:33 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Peter Mac
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 5747
Joined: 10/25/2002

Quote

Demodex Parasites frequently lie in pairs inside a hair follicle

Demodex are covered by a cuticle surface and are semi-transparent

The head and neck contain the four legs
thanks. Now I won't be able to sleep tonight.

Quote

Anyhow, I'm not implying that demodex mites cause androgenetic alopecia (AA is caused my hormones as the name itself suggests!)! I am wondering if demodex mites might play some role in inflammation however... While inflammation isnt the root of androgenetic alopecia it may act as a catalyst.
the link he posted showed that they found demodex bugs in 100% of hair follicles for those suffering from AA and they used that finding as some sort of proof that the bugs are involved with hair loss. I was just saying you can find the bugs in EVERY person in EVERY hair follicle. Their demodex bug conclusions is kind of like saying: "We discovered that every person with hair loss in the United States has been drinking water. Therefore, water must play some role in hair loss." Since water is needed for cellular reactions one could argue water is necessary for the conversion of T to DHT and therefore water is to blame as well for hair loss. Does that sound like the most ridiculous thing you've ever read? Their argument isn't any different.

Quote

My main interest in the subject remains in context of my little female sheltie mix who developed some persistent alopecia on her chest... However, besides the knew jerk reaction from some members on HLT (and maybe Peter Mac here) I havent really heard any good evidence discounting that demodex might play some role in hairloss (again, not the cause but perhaps a contributing factor).
the problem here is that scam marketers advertise if you kill the bugs you'll stop hair loss and there isn't a shred of evidence to show that is true.

Quote

To say that demodex mites play no role in hairloss simply because many other humans who dont have hairloss also have them is like saying DHT cant play any role in hairloss since people who dont lose their hair also produce DHT!!!!

This is not a fair analogy. I refer you to my water analogy above. If you block DHT in someone with hair loss they will likely stop their hair loss and maybe regrow lots of hair. I do concede it is possible that demodex bugs may exacerbate inflammation and inflammation may exacerbate hair loss. The link I posted was about hair loss scams. These marketers make you think if you kill the bugs you'll stop hair loss and that just isn't going to happen. If you take Propecia on the other hand you may very well stop your loss.

Show me one study to prove your hypothesis. Show me one study from a legitimate source showing that killing the demodex bugs has played a significant role in treating AGA, even just through reducing inflammation.

Edited: 11/05/2005 at 09:35 AM by Peter Mac
 11/05/2005 05:39 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Peter Mac
Quote

Demodex Parasites frequently lie in pairs inside a hair follicle
Demodex are covered by a cuticle surface and are semi-transparent
The head and neck contain the four legs


thanks. Now I won't be able to sleep tonight.






Quote

Originally posted by: Peter Mac
Quote

Anyhow, I'm not implying that demodex mites cause androgenetic alopecia (AA is caused my hormones as the name itself suggests!)! I am wondering if demodex mites might play some role in inflammation however... While inflammation isnt the root of androgenetic alopecia it may act as a catalyst.


the link he posted showed that they found demodex bugs in 100% of hair follicles for those suffering from AA and they used that finding as some sort of proof that the bugs are involved with hair loss. I was just saying you can find the bugs in EVERY person in EVERY hair follicle. Their demodex bug conclusions is kind of like saying: "We discovered that every person with hair loss in the United States has been drinking water. Therefore, water must play some role in hair loss." Since water is needed for cellular reactions one could argue water is necessary for the conversion of T to DHT and therefore water is to blame as well for hair loss. Does that sound like the most ridiculous thing you've ever read? Their argument isn't any different.



Can anyone say with any certainty that demodex mites arent involved in hairloss? Not the cause of hairloss, nor a solution to hairloss, but rather a factor? I'm certainly not trying to suggest one way or the other, I'm just curious if the demodex mite might worsen inflammation that was caused by AA?


Quote

Originally posted by: Peter Mac
Quote

My main interest in the subject remains in context of my little female sheltie mix who developed some persistent alopecia on her chest... However, besides the knew jerk reaction from some members on HLT (and maybe Peter Mac here) I havent really heard any good evidence discounting that demodex might play some role in hairloss (again, not the cause but perhaps a contributing factor).


the problem here is that scam marketers advertise if you kill the bugs you'll stop hair loss and there isn't a shred of evidence to show that is true.



Well, I for one would not believe for one second that a man with androgenetic alopecia could stop hairloss by killing demodex bugs as androgenetic alopecia is obviously a hormonal affliction not a parasitic one. So, I 100% agree with you here that any marketer claiming to stop hairloss in those suffering from AA via killing demodex mites is full of sh*t! However, it keeps coming back to my main question of whether or not demodex mites could possibly make inflammation worse in individuals suffering from AA induced inflammation (or atleast some individuals).


Quote

Originally posted by: Peter Mac
Quote

To say that demodex mites play no role in hairloss simply because many other humans who dont have hairloss also have them is like saying DHT cant play any role in hairloss since people who dont lose their hair also produce DHT!!!!


This is not a fair analogy. I refer you to my water analogy above. If you block DHT in someone with hair loss they will likely stop their hair loss and maybe regrow lots of hair. I do concede it is possible that demodex bugs may exacerbate inflammation and inflammation may exacerbate hair loss. The link I posted was about hair loss scams. These marketers make you think if you kill the bugs you'll stop hair loss and that just isn't going to happen. If you take Propecia on the other hand you may very well stop your loss.

Show me one study to prove your hypothesis. Show me one study from a legitimate source showing that killing the demodex bugs has played a significant role in treating AGA, even just through reducing inflammation.


Perhaps my analogy wasnt a good one but my point I was trying to make is you cant rule out a factor (demodex mites in this case) just because even people without hairloss have them as well. I think if one was to claim demodex mites were the main cause of hairloss one could point to the fact that even people without hairloss have them... However, I personally wasnt making that particular assertion I was rather wondering if demodex mites might increase inflammation/irritation to hair follicles that are perhaps already inflamed/irritated from the autoimmune response in reaction to DHT?

Are there any studies you know of that have been done of demodex mites and their possible effect in regard to ongoing androgenetic alopecia? I'm not aware of any studies that show demodex mites do causes any problems with the average male who has androgenetic alopecia but of course that doesnt mean there doesnt exist a relation that just was never looked at!

I'm not trying to take a position here as much as I'm just curious about the possibilities... I wholeheartedly believe that even if you killed every last mite on your head, if you have androgenetic alopecia, you're still going to lose hair. However, being how many of us go to great measures to reduce inflammation in order to help minimize the progression of androgenetic alopecia I'm just curious if looking into the demodex mite "angle" may not be worthwhile?

Any thoughts?
 11/05/2005 06:16 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Peter Mac
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 5747
Joined: 10/25/2002

Quote

Can anyone say with any certainty that demodex mites arent involved in hairloss? Not the cause of hairloss, nor a solution to hairloss, but rather a factor? I'm certainly not trying to suggest one way or the other, I'm just curious if the demodex mite might worsen inflammation that was caused by AA?
Nioxin has a product that supposedly kills the bugs. Does it stop hair loss? nope.
I agree it may be possible that the bugs worsen hair loss. I have no studies to prove otherwise. BUT...like you said, if you kill every last bug you are still going to lose your hair and that was the point of the discussion.

Quote

I'm not trying to take a position here as much as I'm just curious about the possibilities... I wholeheartedly believe that even if you killed every last mite on your head, if you have androgenetic alopecia, you're still going to lose hair. However, being how many of us go to great measures to reduce inflammation in order to help minimize the progression of androgenetic alopecia I'm just curious if looking into the demodex mite "angle" may not be worthwhile?
my girlfriend raised an interesting question. What if you killed the mites and you had rotting demodex mite carcasses in your hair follicles. Would the dead bugs cause more inflammation and thus more hair loss than the live ones?

Edited: 11/05/2005 at 06:17 PM by Peter Mac
 11/06/2005 12:24 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Peter Mac
my girlfriend raised an interesting question. What if you killed the mites and you had rotting demodex mite carcasses in your hair follicles. Would the dead bugs cause more inflammation and thus more hair loss than the live ones?


Thanks Peter Mac! Now *I* wont be able to sleep tonight
 11/06/2005 02:58 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

I found this link off of www.keratin.net:

Quote

Another popular theory is that infection of hair follicles by the Demodex folliculorum parasite is correlated with pattern baldness. By infiltrating the sebaceous gland of hair follicles the parasite causes an immune response and inflammation of surrounding tissue. Through long term invasion the parasite exhausts the hair bulb and shifts the hair cycle from anagen to telogen. This theory is promoted by certain companies that just happen to have a range of products that kill off Demodex folliculorum! At least one of the companies has conducted research that allegedly showed 88% of 240 men with pattern baldness had Demodex folliculorum infection in their hair follicles. There are several problems with this theory.

First, Demodex folliculorum infection is very common. Up to 75% of the population, men, women, and children, have Demodex folliculorum infection. However, there is a clear bias towards men have pattern hair loss even though children and women are equally susceptible to Demodex folliculorum infection. If Demodex folliculorum infection was causing inflammation that pushed hair follicles into telogen then one would expect to see some children with pattern baldness and that women would be equally affected with hair loss. Indeed, women have a stronger immune system and so one might expect more women than men to have pattern baldness, but this is not the case.

Second, research has shown that there are excessive numbers of the Demodex folliculorum parasite in eyelash follicles. (Fulk et al. Optom Vis Sci 1996 Dec;73(12):742-745). However, people with pattern baldness do not lose their eyelash hairs.

Third, it would be impossible for hair follicle transplants to work. Given thousands of transplant procedures are done every year and 88% of men have Demodex folliculorum infection, then most of the men with hair transplants must also have Demodex folliculorum infection. In a hair transplant, follicles are moved from the back of the head to the top of the same individual. If the individual is infected with Demodex folliculorum one would expect that the transplanted follicles would either already be infected, or become infected in their new location. However, transplanted follicles grow in every individual who has had the procedure done and pattern baldness does not redevelop.

Fourth, there is evidence to show that pattern baldness is associated with hair follicle inflammation for some people. However, studies have been done to look at the effects of topical anti-inflammatory solutions on pattern baldness. While the anti-inflammatory solutions did reduce hair follicle inflammation they did not promote hair follicle regrowth.

Fifth, there is a widely available treatment to Demodex folliculorum infection, pilocarpine gel. However, using this gel on the skin does not promote any hair growth.

The more likely explanation for Demodex folliculorum infection in men with pattern baldness is that the sebaceous glands of alopecia affected hair follicles become larger and more active, producing oils at a faster rate, under the influence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The oils combine with dead cells from the hair follicle to make sebum. The sebum is a rich source of nutrients and this is the food that Demodex folliculorum eats. The oil food supply increases in most hair follicles affected by pattern baldness so these hair follicles can accommodate a greater number of Demodex folliculorum parasites. Rather than the parasites causing pattern alopecia, they simply take advantage of the increased food produced. The parasite infection is a consequence of pattern baldness and not a cause of the hair loss.

http://hairquackery.com/hairquackery/hairscientificclaims/008demodexcauseshairloss.shtml


Interesting points against demodex mites being a factor in hairloss!
 11/10/2005 02:29 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Harry Balls
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4780
Joined: 08/15/2005

thanx Farrel.

-------------------------
http://www.hairlosshelp.com/websites/Harry%20Balls/
 11/10/2005 02:39 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
5001matt
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 1021
Joined: 08/14/2003

PLEASE GOD NOT THE DEMODEX CRAP AGAIN!!!

 11/11/2005 08:35 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

Well, I ordered some Face Doctor soap (only $12 bucks and I can atleast use it to wash my face even if it doesnt help with anything else). I'm also going to ask my doctor, for sh*t & giggles, for some pilocarpine gel.

Nothing to lose! LoL
 11/11/2005 11:28 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
CROAT2
Regular Poster

Posts: 189
Joined: 01/29/2005

socks,

take beta sitosterol and flax seed lignans instead of saw palmetto.

research A HUGE number of "immortal hair" posts on regrowth.com forum.

i've started with beta sis; still waiting lignans to come.

 11/11/2005 06:53 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

Quote

Originally posted by: CROAT2
research A HUGE number of "immortal hair" posts on regrowth.com forum.


I'll do that bud. Where are you ordering your beta sitosterol and flax seed lignans from?

Edited: 11/11/2005 at 06:55 PM by Socks
 11/12/2005 08:18 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
CROAT2
Regular Poster

Posts: 189
Joined: 01/29/2005

socks,

flax seed lignans- brand "source naturals", product "lignan extract 60 caps": www.smartbomb.com (this site is the only one exporting to croatia,europe). see also www.iherb.com.

beta sitosterol- brand "doctor's trust", product "beta sitosterol complex,formula, 180 caplets": www.doctorstrust.com.

croat

Edited: 11/12/2005 at 08:19 AM by CROAT2
 11/12/2005 01:17 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
random32
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 663
Joined: 03/04/2005

man you people are obsessive. It's like your HL worries are almost eating you alive
 12/15/2005 05:20 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Zardoz
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 1089
Joined: 01/17/2003

Demodex mites are a strong cause of human acne and rosacea, according to a team of Chinese doctors who reportedly labored for 30 years and saw 900,000 (!) patients, I understand. These doctors developed a herbal formula to treat this condition. This formula has reportedly won international awards. The role of mites in human hair loss is less determined. Recently (Sept 2005) a double-blind demodex medical study, proving the worth of the herbal formula to dramatically reduce redness and inflammation due to rosacea, was performed in the USA by Dr. Neil Bhatia, Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, I understand. I don't think we have heard the last of the demodex theory of hairloss. I understand that the demodex mites don't like light, and only come out at night. Maybe we can zap them with a strong germicidal lamp I understand that infants do not have these mites at birth, but most adults do. The fact that the mites like to spread to other hair follicles when it gets too crowded where they are, suggests that they may play a role in diffuse hairloss associated with pattern hairloss (AGA), if I may be so bold.

Edited: 12/15/2005 at 08:39 PM by Zardoz
 12/15/2005 05:30 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Farrel
Moderator

Posts: 23814
Joined: 07/19/2000

Its entirely possible that populations of Demodex increase as a result of the increase in sebum, ie their food supply. However upon simple examination of the pattern of hair loss in MPB its obvious that Demodex dont cause hair loss else the entire head would go bald as well. So too would any hair thats transplanted to the balding areas.

Demodex may contribute to the irritation thats present in some people suffering with hair loss, but they definitely dont cause MPB.

Our bodies are crawling with microorganisms which normally dont cause any kind of problems at all.

-------------------------
Disclaimer - I am not a physician or an expert and my advice should not be considered medical/expert advice. - If you follow my opinions and/or advice you do so at your own risk.

Edited: 12/15/2005 at 05:34 PM by Farrel
 12/15/2005 08:11 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Zardoz
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 1089
Joined: 01/17/2003

Socks: Where do you get the FaceDoctor soap for $12. On E-Bay? There is also a facial creme, I understand, for those who don't like the drying effect of the soap. I have some deep-seated facial acne that resists other treatment. Maybe I will try the creme on some patches of hair/scalp as well, like at the itchy hairline. I presently use a little emu oil with aloe.

Edited: 12/16/2005 at 06:37 PM by Zardoz
 12/16/2005 04:40 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Socks
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 4435
Joined: 06/14/2004

Zardoz,

I bought my last bar of FaceDoctor soap from the following:

China Mystique FaceDoctor Soap
 12/16/2005 02:25 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Yellow Bamboo
Prolific Poster

Posts: 298
Joined: 06/25/2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Socks
Zardoz,



I bought my last bar of FaceDoctor soap from the following:



China Mystique FaceDoctor Soap


I tried Semodex shampoo a few years ago and it did help my scalp condition somewhat but was too drying. Works along the same principle (anti-Demodex mite). As Farrell and others have already stated, it doesn't cause MPB. But it may contribute to the adverse itch and dandruff some of us deal with in addition to it.

FWIW, the Morris Mann patent, which I basically use as a guide for my existing regimen, mentions that the fungus contributing to hairloss is spread by an ectoparasite. Dunno if they're referring to the Demodex mite specifically, but once again the patent doesn't mention the mite as causing hairloss, just a contributor to the overall problem.

Doing a little digging on this Face Doctor[x] product line, the active ingredient is Seabuckthorn oil which should be available in most health food stores locally esp those which have aromatherapy lines. SBT is probably old news however as a number of shampoos already contain it, and we would likely know by now if it (as well as the whole anti-Demodex approach) helped significantly, by itself. But it may be a halfway-decent adjunct to a regimen esp as it's not that pricey.
 12/16/2005 02:38 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Farrel
Moderator

Posts: 23814
Joined: 07/19/2000

My personal opinion the way it works goes like this.

In a healthy follicle the demodex population has a symbiotic relationship with the follicle and causes no problem. In a MPB impacted follicle two things are happening due to the effect of androgens.

1. Excessive sebum/oil is being created.

2. This sebum/oil is not being drawn off due to the miniaturizing of the hair shaft and starts accumulating.


This unhealthy environment leads to an excess population of demodex and/or an excessive amount of waste products. These waste products start to decay causing a foreign body reaction and response by the immune system.

This then leads to this incessant itching of the scalp.

-------------------------
Disclaimer - I am not a physician or an expert and my advice should not be considered medical/expert advice. - If you follow my opinions and/or advice you do so at your own risk.

Edited: 12/16/2005 at 02:39 PM by Farrel
 12/16/2005 07:22 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Zardoz
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 1089
Joined: 01/17/2003

Farrel, Socks: Thanks for your input. The "demodex itch", if that is what it is, definately exacerbates my diffuse/pattern hair loss. It seems to be fueled by summer sweat, not using enough pinesol in the cold water wash, sunlight (UV?), mold spores(?), fungus?, excessive scalp oiliness, taking pygeum (beta-sis), and eating poorly, like consuming sugary colas and commercial ice cream. I may also have mild hypoglycemia and insulin resistance, and hence low IGF-1. Why didn't anyone (doctors) ever tell me about this connection? I have a deep-seated "acne" about my nose, that expresses itself in the summer months. I also have loss of eyebrow hair (thinning, more sparse), which Dr. Proctor says is not DHT-pattern related. From China, they now have hairloss products for what they call a "seborrheic alopecia". I was advised before by a Chinese herbalist to pour green or black tea on my scalp for excessive scalp-oiliness-related hair loss! Maybe the caffeine or tannic acid in it is helpful. I have since tamed my scalp oiliness with topical zinc, etc. Ever notice that many of those who are going thru MPB are usually scratching their very oily scalps? Maybe demodex is aggravating/accelerating their condition. Demodex infection may possibly promote scalp oiliness to be sure it is getting the food it needs. I notice that scalp biopsies show greatly enlarged sebaceous oil glands in those with severe MPB, suggesting an infection or irritation. White bulbs on fallen hair, the so-called "peri-follicular inflammation", may be visible signs of an immune response to an irritant or infection. I understand that Nioxin Semodex does not actually kill the demodex infection, just helps to remove the nasty byproducts of its metabolism. The FaceDoctor herbal soap actually eliminates the demodex infection in rosacea, it is suggested. They can't say it is a "cure" because they would probably get in trouble with the FDA. They can only say in the USA that it reduces redness and inflammation associated with acne rosacea. I never had any noticible scalp redness except when I was using a coal tar extract therapeutic shampoo (T-Gel). Maybe it was working. Maybe I need to use a good herbal scalp rinse, like I did before. That's my two cents.

Edited: 12/21/2005 at 12:06 PM by Zardoz
Hair Loss Help » Hair Loss Open Topic » Demodex mite & hairloss

1 2 3 4 Next Last unread
Topic Tools Topic Tools
Statistics
31496 users are registered to the Hair Loss Help forum.
There are currently 8 users logged in.
The most users ever online was 10152 on 02/16/2012 at 11:47 AM.
There are currently 517 guests browsing this forum, which makes a total of 525 users using this forum.

FuseTalk Basic Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.

Copyright 2001-2012 - All Rights Reserved - Hairlosshelp, Inc