hair loss help.com is your complete hair loss guide and resource for info about Propecia, Rogaine, minoxidil, transplants, thymuskin, Revivogen, folliguard, tricomin and other hair loss and baldness remedies
Hair Loss Help
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: CALOSOL - Proven Treatment or SCAM?
Topic Summary:
Created On: 07/08/2007 06:15 AM
Status: Post and Reply
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 07/08/2007 06:15 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005

Opinions?
 07/08/2007 06:30 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Canada
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 730
Joined: 02/21/2005

Pete seems to like it lol.
 07/08/2007 06:35 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005



I believe that Andy Bryant is making big bucks from CALOSOL


The Benefits of Inversion - Inversion and Hair Loss
According to several sources, inversion may even help to reduce hair loss! According to the Times Online(1), the idea is that whilst inverted, increased blow flow to your scalp, helps to stimulate the hair follicles. Additionally, Andy Bryant, author of 'The Baldness Cure', states that there are three main causes of hair loss:

1) Blood experiences difficulties making its way to the hair follicle owing to vasoconstriction and muscular tension.
2) The small amount of blood that does get through to the hair follicle, does not carry with it sufficient nutrients for hair growth.
3) The waste products from cellular activity find it difficult to drain away from the scalp through the lymphatic system.

Bryant personally increased the rate at which his hair grew by increasing blood flow back into the scalp, by the use of an inversion table on a regular basis. According to Bryant, he achieved an improvement in his hair growth due the effect of inversion on blood flow to the scalp. Inversion not only facilitates the blood flow downhill toward the capillaries in the scalp, but also inversion helps to open the capillaries further when baroreceptors in the neck and chest sense an increase in blood pressure to the head and act to reduce that pressure by dilating all the capillaries in the body (including those that service the hair follicles.)


Oh Dear. Excerpt is from This site
 07/08/2007 07:00 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Recreant
Prolific Poster

Posts: 261
Joined: 06/01/2007

I just started Calosol. I have that V shape at my hairline and i'm doing a little test by using Tricomin on my left bald spot and Calosol on the right. Going to see which achieves me no results faster!
 07/08/2007 07:33 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Pete
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 2325
Joined: 02/14/2002

Quote

Originally posted by: g'day
Opinions?



Its designed to reverse the body's IMMUNAL response ie INFLAMMATION in Alopecia Areata cases.

There is a long running thread on keratin.com on it.

Elias is working on getting a Clinical trial together:

Clinical trials




Regards
Pete

Edited: 07/08/2007 at 07:38 AM by Pete
 07/09/2007 02:01 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005

Thanks Pete, I'll have a 'captain cook'

How would you compare the effectiveness of Calosol to finasteride?

Cheers
 07/09/2007 03:53 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
chrome
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 2910
Joined: 01/11/2004

A link from the Calosol website directs you a Times article, dated 19 Sep 2000.

The Times article sayS :

"Now, after nearly 20 years of mixing lotions and potions and testing them on himself and willing volunteers in a study based in his Bognor Regis laboratory, he has developed a product called Calosol, from a common plant family that he will not publicly name.This secrecy stems partly from a confidentiality agreement with Phytopharm, the British plant-based medicines manufacturer that has been laboratory-testing Calosol for more than two years, and which claims that there have been no side effects associated with its use....Phytopharm, which calls Bouras's formula P45, has not yet decided whether it will develop it as a prescription medicine or as a special shampoo or creatn. If and when the time comes, Bouras will supply the firm with his formula.


However, in January 2001, Phytopharm announced the Phase 2 results of P45 (Calosol)). The trial was a FAILURE and it was binned. As a result, the shares in Phytopharm dived.

I remember it only too well...I WAS A SHAREHOLDER AT THE TIME !

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

18 January 2001


18 January 2001

Results of Phase II Trial of P45 for Male Pattern Baldness

Phytopharm plc (PYM: London Stock Exchange) ('Phytopharm') announces today the
results of its Phase II clinical trial of P45, a topical cream derived from a
medicinal plant for the treatment of hair loss (alopecia). This condition
includes alopecia androgenica (male pattern baldness) and alopecia areata and
totalis, both of which are the autoimmune forms of the disease.

The study in alopecia androgenica was a randomised, double blind, placebo
controlled study conducted by 3 centres within the UK. 75 patients were
randomly assigned to apply either P45 or an inert placebo cream to the bald
areas of their scalp once daily for 52 weeks. Patients were asked to attend
the clinic after the first 4 weeks of treatment and every two months
thereafter. 24 patients completed the 1 year treatment period (13 and 11 in
the P45 and placebo groups, respectively).

Data from 69 patients were analysed, carrying forward the last score generated
for those patients who dropped out of the study. The two treatment groups were
generally well matched for baseline characteristics, including the pattern,
severity and duration of alopecia. Using the primary efficacy measure of the
investigator's assessment of hair re-growth, 29% of the patients treated with
P45 were reported to have achieved hair re-growth. However, a positive
response was also reported for 38% of the placebo group which was not
statistically different compared with those that received P45. The patients
also provided their own assessment of response to treatment, which was
reported to be favourable by 21% of subjects in both treatment groups.
Possible treatment related adverse events were recorded for 34% and 24% of the
patients in the P45 and placebo groups, respectively. The majority of these
events were mild scalp reactions.

The data do not support the efficacy of P45 cream as a treatment for male
pattern baldness. However the outcome of the study may have been influenced by
the large number of patients that failed to complete the 52 week treatment
period and the unexpectedly high placebo response rate that was reported by
the investigators. The results confirm that treatment with P45 cream is
generally well tolerated and has a satisfactory overall safety profile.

Alopecia androgenica has been studied in two previously reported double blind
trials. A Phase III study on Finasteride (Merck & Co.,Inc USA) reported an
increase in mean hair density of 11% in the treatment group compared with a
loss of 2.7% in the placebo group after one year of treatment amongst 1,533
male subjects. A small study of Minoxidil (Pharmacia Corp., USA) in 36 men
treated over 96 weeks reported a 30% increase in hair mass in the treatment
group compared with an 8% loss in hair mass in the placebo group.

Dr. Richard Dixey, Chief Executive of Phytopharm, said: 'We have not met our
primary objective of demonstrating a difference between active and placebo
groups in this study, and have experienced a large placebo response which has
not previously been reported in clinical trials of this condition. The safety
data gathered from the interim analysis of this study reported early last year
has enabled us to conduct a further study in alopecia areata and totalis. We
must await the results of this latter study before deciding the future
direction of this project.'



Enquiries:
Phytopharm plc
Dr Richard Dixey, Chief Executive Tel: 01480 437697
Mobile: 07867 782000


Edited: 07/09/2007 at 03:58 AM by chrome
 07/09/2007 04:09 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005

Thank you Chrome
 07/09/2007 04:09 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Troymaclure
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 6553
Joined: 12/03/2001

Garbage....snake-oil garbage
 07/09/2007 04:13 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005

Do you think it is a CON?
 07/09/2007 04:22 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
chrome
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 2910
Joined: 01/11/2004

Quote

Originally posted by: g'day
Do you think it is a CON?


its been going atleast 27 years and only has 12 one or two line testimonials on their website and FAILED phase 2 trials 6 years ago.





Edited: 07/09/2007 at 04:24 AM by chrome
 07/09/2007 04:26 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005

mmmmm......................I wonder why our pete loves this product so much


 07/09/2007 04:53 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Troymaclure
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 6553
Joined: 12/03/2001

yes, it is a puzzle...
 07/10/2007 05:58 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
g'day
Prolific Poster

Posts: 475
Joined: 01/12/2005

any rebuttal, pete?
 07/10/2007 10:40 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
Pete
Accomplished Poster

Posts: 2325
Joined: 02/14/2002

Quote

Originally posted by: chrome
A link from the Calosol website directs you a Times article, dated 19 Sep 2000.



The Times article sayS :



"Now, after nearly 20 years of mixing lotions and potions and testing them on himself and willing volunteers in a study based in his Bognor Regis laboratory, he has developed a product called Calosol, from a common plant family that he will not publicly name.This secrecy stems partly from a confidentiality agreement with Phytopharm, the British plant-based medicines manufacturer that has been laboratory-testing Calosol for more than two years, and which claims that there have been no side effects associated with its use....Phytopharm, which calls Bouras's formula P45, has not yet decided whether it will develop it as a prescription medicine or as a special shampoo or creatn. If and when the time comes, Bouras will supply the firm with his formula.





However, in January 2001, Phytopharm announced the Phase 2 results of P45 (Calosol)). The trial was a FAILURE and it was binned. As a result, the shares in Phytopharm dived.



I remember it only too well...I WAS A SHAREHOLDER AT THE TIME !



-------------------------------------------------------------------------



18 January 2001





18 January 2001



Results of Phase II Trial of P45 for Male Pattern Baldness



Phytopharm plc (PYM: London Stock Exchange) ('Phytopharm') announces today the

results of its Phase II clinical trial of P45, a topical cream derived from a

medicinal plant for the treatment of hair loss (alopecia). This condition

includes alopecia androgenica (male pattern baldness) and alopecia areata and

totalis, both of which are the autoimmune forms of the disease.



The study in alopecia androgenica was a randomised, double blind, placebo

controlled study conducted by 3 centres within the UK. 75 patients were

randomly assigned to apply either P45 or an inert placebo cream to the bald

areas of their scalp once daily for 52 weeks. Patients were asked to attend

the clinic after the first 4 weeks of treatment and every two months

thereafter. 24 patients completed the 1 year treatment period (13 and 11 in

the P45 and placebo groups, respectively).



Data from 69 patients were analysed, carrying forward the last score generated

for those patients who dropped out of the study. The two treatment groups were

generally well matched for baseline characteristics, including the pattern,

severity and duration of alopecia. Using the primary efficacy measure of the

investigator's assessment of hair re-growth, 29% of the patients treated with

P45 were reported to have achieved hair re-growth. However, a positive

response was also reported for 38% of the placebo group which was not

statistically different compared with those that received P45. The patients

also provided their own assessment of response to treatment, which was

reported to be favourable by 21% of subjects in both treatment groups.

Possible treatment related adverse events were recorded for 34% and 24% of the

patients in the P45 and placebo groups, respectively. The majority of these

events were mild scalp reactions.



The data do not support the efficacy of P45 cream as a treatment for male

pattern baldness. However the outcome of the study may have been influenced by

the large number of patients that failed to complete the 52 week treatment

period and the unexpectedly high placebo response rate that was reported by

the investigators. The results confirm that treatment with P45 cream is

generally well tolerated and has a satisfactory overall safety profile.



Alopecia androgenica has been studied in two previously reported double blind

trials. A Phase III study on Finasteride (Merck & Co.,Inc USA) reported an

increase in mean hair density of 11% in the treatment group compared with a

loss of 2.7% in the placebo group after one year of treatment amongst 1,533

male subjects. A small study of Minoxidil (Pharmacia Corp., USA) in 36 men

treated over 96 weeks reported a 30% increase in hair mass in the treatment

group compared with an 8% loss in hair mass in the placebo group.



Dr. Richard Dixey, Chief Executive of Phytopharm, said: 'We have not met our

primary objective of demonstrating a difference between active and placebo

groups in this study, and have experienced a large placebo response which has

not previously been reported in clinical trials of this condition. The safety

data gathered from the interim analysis of this study reported early last year

has enabled us to conduct a further study in alopecia areata and totalis. We

must await the results of this latter study before deciding the future

direction of this project.'







Enquiries:

Phytopharm plc

Dr Richard Dixey, Chief Executive Tel: 01480 437697

Mobile: 07867 782000








Drop the phytopharm guys an email as to why they think it didnt work.

ie. Did they use the same Original Formula in the trial? Do they actually think that the Original Formula works
as the inventor has cited?


Id be interested in their reponse.






Regards
Pete



Edited: 07/10/2007 at 01:19 PM by Pete
 10/15/2007 04:18 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message

Author Icon
WangFuYung
Newbie

Posts: 2
Joined: 10/13/2007

any updates? i just bought some. and it doesn't sound good.
Statistics
32078 users are registered to the Hair Loss Help forum.
There are currently 9 users logged in.
The most users ever online was 10152 on 02/16/2012 at 11:47 AM.
There are currently 447 guests browsing this forum, which makes a total of 456 users using this forum.

FuseTalk Basic Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.

Copyright 2001-2012 - All Rights Reserved - Hairlosshelp, Inc