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Topic Title: Topical Estrogen source for hair growth
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Created On: 05/18/2003 12:23 AM
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 05/18/2003 12:23 AM
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Chim chim
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Experimental studies suggest that active compounds in licorice may have estrogen-like effects. There are also people who have stated that topical licorice extract is great for hair growth. Is this a viable option to 17 a-estradiol?
 05/18/2003 05:33 PM
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Chim chim
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Waseda said that Licorice is a key ingredient in Japan hair formulas. Is he off?
 05/18/2003 10:34 PM
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Leandro
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History of the endocrine effects of licorice.

Armanini D, Fiore C, Mattarello MJ, Bielenberg J, Palermo M.

Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences -Endocrinology University of Padua, Italy.

The history of licorice as an officinal plant dates back thousands of years, and licorice is still appreciated as a medicinal root. Many of its endocrine properties can be derived from observations of Authors of the ancient world, when hormones were not known. Inappropriate use of licorice can produce pseudoaldosteronism, by inactivating 11beta-hydroxysteroiod-dehydrogenase and by binding to mineralocorticoid receptors. Licorice possesses many other therapeutic properties as to potentiate the action of cortisol, to reduce testosterone synthesis, especially in women, to exert an estrogen-like activity and to reduce body fat mass. The chronological development of research on these effects is described.

PMID: 12373628 [PubMed - in process]

And then, there's this one I'm curious about as the abstract is not available at pubmed...

Reduction of serum testosterone in men by licorice.

Armanini D, Bonanni G, Palermo M.

Publication Types:
Letter

PMID: 10515764 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


 05/19/2003 12:54 AM
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Androgen
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<< And then, there's this one I'm curious about as the abstract is not available at pubmed...
Reduction of serum testosterone in men by licorice.
>>



I found that study at alt.baldspot. Be warned however that licorice has several potential feminizing sideeffects like loss of libido and weight gain. Most commercial licorice also contains high amounts of salt which can cause water retension.

Anyway, on with the study:


The New England Journal of Medicine -- October 7, 1999 -- Vol. 341, No. 15


Reduction of Serum Testosterone in Men by Licorice

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

To the Editor:

Extracts of licorice root are widely used in many countries as flavoring
agents, breath fresheners, or candy. The active component of licorice is
glycyrrhizic acid, which is hydrolyzed in vivo to glycyrrhetinic acid. The
well-known mineralocorticoid-like effect of licorice results from the
inhibition of 11(beta)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, the enzyme that
catalyzes the conversion of cortisol to cortisone, thereby minimizing the
binding of cortisol to mineralocorticoid receptors. (1) Licorice may also
directly activate mineralocorticoid receptors. (2) In vitro, licorice can
block 17(beta)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the conversion
of androstenedione to testosterone. (3)

We evaluated the effect of licorice on gonadal function in seven normal men,
22 to 24 years of age. The men were given 7 g daily of a commercial
preparation of licorice in the form of tablets (Saila, Bologna, Italy)
containing 0.5 g of glycyrrhizic acid, as determined by gas
chromatography-mass spectrometry; the effect on the metabolism of
mineralocorticoids in these men was reported previously. (2) Serum
testosterone, androstenedione, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone were measured by
radioimmunoassay before and after four and seven days of administration of
licorice and four days after it was discontinued. During the period of
licorice administration, the men's serum testosterone concentrations
decreased and their serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations increased
(Table 1).

These results demonstrate that licorice inhibits both
17(beta)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17,20-lyase, which catalyzes the
conversion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone to androstenedione. The amounts of
licorice given to these men are eaten by many people. Thus, men with
decreased libido or other sexual dysfunction, as well as those with
hypertension, should be questioned about licorice ingestion.

 05/19/2003 01:31 AM
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Chim chim
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What about topically, guys?
 05/19/2003 08:39 AM
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Leandro
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<< What about topically, guys? >>



I've been using it daily for a month or so, with no problems. I've followed Waseda's instructions on Hairsite...

Aquous licorice extract is being used to treat acne in some countries. So, it's a good sign it may work on beating local testosterone if applied topically.
 05/19/2003 10:42 AM
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Chim chim
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How do you use it? In shampoo?

Do you use an alcohol based tincture?

How about dealing with the smell?
 05/19/2003 01:33 PM
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Leandro
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<< How do you use it? In shampoo?
Do you use an alcohol based tincture?
How about dealing with the smell?
>>



I followed Waseda's instructions.
I boiled some licorice powder. Then addded some alcohol.
No smell. The only problem is when it gets to clothes, it's hard to remove the brown color...

The instructions I follow:

Licorice - a sweet herb that possesses significant anti-inflammatory properties – It is indispensable for Morehairin and highly recommended for Souhakuhi. You can even add licorice extract to topical minoxidil.

What is Licorice?
Licorice (Glycyrrhiza Glabra) is a sweet herb that possesses significant anti-inflammatory propterties. It is also excellent in keeping the scalp moist and hydrated when used in conjunction with Senburi (30g licorice root + 5g Senburi + 500ml water, boil in low heat for one hour until it reduces to a 300ml solution). According to Waseda, Licorice is indispensable to Morehairin and is recommended for compounding Souhakuhi.
Licorice may be helpful for adrenal insufficiencies or exhaustion, allergies, headaches, Addison disease, colds, soothes coughs, bronchitis, laryngitis, pharyngitis, liver protectant, female complaints, stomach inflammation and ulcers, colitis, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, immune weakness and lung problems.
Licorice is also known as Kanzo, Gan Cao, Chinese licorice, Glycyrrhiza uralensis

How to make Licorice? (by itself)
Waseda recommends formulating a 20% root / total volume solution. If you use 10g of Licorice root, you would boil it in 50ml (10g / 0.2) of water which should be good for about 100 day use.

How to use Licorice for treating dry scalp?
30g licorice root + 5g Senburi + 500ml water – boil in low heat for 1 hour until the concoction reduces to about 300ml. Filter the grounds. After applying any alcoholic topical lotions, spray licorice-senburi solution on scalp.

Finer Details
1) Waseda said it is a good idea to add licorice extract to minoxidil. You do not need to add extra alcohol.

2) It is ok to use extract powder for licorice, but not for mulberry and bayberry.

3) Do not use Solgar Licorice capsules. According to Waseda, the licorice is deglycyrrhized. It does not work well for hair growth. It is important to use licorice root.

Warning on licorice and Waseda’s response
Warning on Licorice Extract
From: Should we?
Date: 01 Apr 2001
Time: 16:31:30
Remote Name: 24.234.246.224
Comments
Here is the study from the New England Journal of Medicine about Licorice
The New England Journal of Medicine -- October 7, 1999 -- Vol. 341, No. 15
Reduction of Serum Testosterone in Men by Licorice
---------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----
To the Editor:
Extracts of licorice root are widely used in many countries as flavoring agents, breath fresheners, or candy. The active component of licorice is glycyrrhizic acid, which is hydrolyzed in vivo to glycyrrhetinic acid. The well-known mineralocorticoid-like effect of licorice results from the inhibition of 11(beta)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of cortisol to cortisone, thereby minimizing the binding of cortisol to mineralocorticoid receptors. (1) Licorice may also directly activate mineralocorticoid receptors. (2) In vitro, licorice can block 17(beta)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone. (3)
We evaluated the effect of licorice on gonadal function in seven normal men, 22 to 24 years of age. The men were given 7 g daily of a commercial preparation of licorice in the form of tablets (Saila, Bologna, Italy) containing 0.5 g of glycyrrhizic acid, as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; the effect on the metabolism of mineralocorticoids in these men was reported previously. (2) Serum testosterone, androstenedione, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone were measured by radioimmunoassay before and after four and seven days of administration of licorice and four days after it was discontinued. During the period of licorice administration, the men's serum testosterone concentrations decreased and their serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations increased (Table 1).
These results demonstrate that licorice inhibits both 17(beta)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17,20-lyase, which catalyzes the conversion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone to androstenedione. The amounts of licorice given to these men are eaten by many people. Thus, men with decreased libido or other sexual dysfunction, as well as those with hypertension, should be questioned about licorice ingestion
Re: Warning on Licorice Extract
From: waseda
Date: 01 Apr 2001
Time: 17:24:24
Remote Name: 211.132.33.111
Comments
This is one reason why almost (Japanese) hair loss products include licorice extract or glycyrrhetinic acid topically in them.
From long use of Chinese traditinal herbal medicines, it is well known that oral intake of licorice root is safe if it is within 1g per day. This means oral safe licorice for 100 days is 100g.
Souhakuhi-extract, Moreharin use licorice extract (topically) 10g-30g per 100days use. This equals 1/10-1/3 of orally safe intake of licorice amount. It's safe enough but may be insufficient for MPB with excessive testosterone. But I prefer to safety.
On the similar basis, 1 oz licorice root extract per 100 days use is safe enough.
But, I must say licorice should be taken topically but not orally as well as Grape Seed Extract for hair loss men
The licorice in this study was taken orally Re: Warning on Licorice Extract
From: Thanks
Date: 01 Apr 2001
Time: 17:24:32
Remote Name: 206.29.197.150
Comments


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